Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Paths

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:15 Written by Mire_B Thursday, 25 June 2009 01:14

If you were thinking that the Windows 7 client upgrade paths looked a bit lonely, you were probably right. But maybe the supported and unsupported Widows Server 2008 R2 SKU upgrade paths could kee them company – the Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Matrix.
  

Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Test Matrix

The following table outlines supported and unsupported upgrade paths for Windows Server 2008 R2 SKUs.
• Cross-architecture in-place upgrades (for example, x86 to x64) are not supported.
• Cross-language in-place upgrades (for example, en-us to de-de) are not supported.
• Cross-build type in-place upgrades (for example, fre to chk) are not supported.
• Cross-media type in-place upgrades (for example, Staged to Unstaged or Unstaged to Staged) are not supported.

Note

For a Web version of this document, see the Windows Server 2008 R2 Upgrade Test Matrix in the Windows Server TechCenter Library.

Milestone support

• Windows Server 2008 R2 M3 to Windows Server 2008 R2 Beta in-place upgrade is supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 M3 to Windows Server 2008 R2 RC in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 M3 to Windows Server 2008 R2 RTM in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 Beta to Windows Server 2008 R2 RC in-place upgrade is supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 Beta to Windows Server 2008 R2 RTM in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 RC to Windows Server 2008 R2 RTM in-place upgrade is supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 RC to Windows Server 2008 R2 IDS in-place upgrade is supported.
• Windows Server 2008 R2 IDS to Windows Server 2008 R2 RTM in-place upgrade is supported.

Upgrade table

The column headings in the following table relate to the edition of the Windows Server 2008 R2 operating system that you are upgrading to.

Table legend

• X = Upgrade is not supported. An error message appears in the Compatibility Report or in a Setup dialog box.
• x86 = x86 to x86 in-place upgrade is supported
• x64 = x64 to x64 in-place upgrade is supported
• RIU = Repair in-place upgrade is supported. This is a Microsoft Customer Service and Support scenario where the user performs a “Windows Server 2008 R2 SKU” to “Windows Server 2008 R2 same SKU” in-place upgrade as a means of repair (for example, upgrading Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise to Windows Server 2008 R2 Enterprise.

 Note

Windows Server 2008 RTM is marked as “RTM-SP1″ because a user sees “Windows Server 2008 Service Pack 1″ in the system information.


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Windows 7 Upgrade Paths

Last Updated on Saturday, 27 June 2009 09:06 Written by Mire_B Thursday, 25 June 2009 12:07

Don’t you just wish that there was a graphic with all the supported and unsupported upgrade paths for all Windows 7 editions? A complete overview of the Windows 7 SKU upgrade matrix? I must confess that I actually spotted the Windows 7 Upgrade Test Matrix early today, but credit has to go to the guys at ActiveWin which have already mentioned the download.

Windows 7 Upgrade Test Matrix

The following table outlines supported and unsupported upgrade paths for Windows 7 SKUs.
• Cross-architecture in-place upgrades (for example, x86 to x64) are not supported.
• Cross-language in-place upgrades (for example, en-us to de-de) are not supported.
• Cross-build type in-place upgrades (for example, fre to chk) are not supported.
• Cross-media type in-place upgrades (for example, Staged to Unstaged or Unstaged to Staged) are not supported.

Notes

• For a complete view of Windows 7 resources, articles, demos, and guidance, please visit the Springboard Series for Windows 7 on the Windows Client TechCenter.
• For a Web version of this document, see the Windows 7 Upgrade Test Matrix in the Windows Client TechCenter Library.

Milestone support

• Windows 7 M3 to Windows 7 Beta in-place upgrade is supported.
• Windows 7 M3 to Windows 7 RC in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows 7 M3 to Windows 7 RTM in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows 7 Beta to Windows 7 RC in-place upgrade is supported.

Note

Beta to RC paths are not supported.

• Windows 7 Beta to Windows 7 RTM in-place upgrade is NOT supported.
• Windows 7 RC to Windows 7 RTM in-place upgrade is supported.

Note

RC to RTM paths are not supported.

Upgrade table

The column headings in the following table relate to the edition of the Windows 7 operating system that you are upgrading to.

Table legend

• X = Upgrade is not supported. An error message appears in the Compatibility Report or in a Setup dialog box.
• x86 = x86 to x86 in-place upgrade is supported
• x64 = x64 to x64 in-place upgrade is supported
• RIU = Repair in-place upgrade is supported. This is a Microsoft Customer Service and Support scenario where the user performs a “Windows 7 SKU” to “Windows 7 same SKU” in-place upgrade as a means of repair (for example, upgrading Windows 7 Ultimate to Windows 7 Ultimate.
• RIUx86 = Repair in-place upgrade is supported for x86 only.
• WAU = Windows Anytime Upgrade is supported. WAU uses the Transmogrifier platform to transform a lower Windows 7 SKU to a higher Windows 7 SKU (for example, Windows 7 Home Basic to Windows 7 Ultimate.)

Notes

• Windows 7 “K” editions follow the same upgrade paths as their corresponding Windows 7 edition. K is the localized Korean version of an edition.
• This matrix identifies only supported upgrades between like regulatory N, E, and KN SKUs. For example, Windows 7 Starter N can only be upgraded through WAU to other N SKUs.


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Windows 7 Pricing

Last Updated on Thursday, 25 June 2009 10:50 Written by Mire_B Thursday, 25 June 2009 10:45

For all the efforts it made keeping its ear to the street, it looks like Microsoft managed to miss customer input on just just how much Windows 7 should cost. I guess that there’s only so much feedback you can take into account, and for Microsoft the saturation point must have been reached when they dedied to let customers open the box with the next generation of Windows packaging.

Estimated retail prices for Windows 7 upgrade packaged retail product:

    * Windows 7 Home Premium (Upgrade): $119.99
    * Windows 7 Professional (Upgrade): $199.99
    * Windows 7 Ultimate (Upgrade): $219.99

Estimated retail prices for Windows 7 full packaged retail product:

    * Windows 7 Home Premium (Full): $199.99
    * Windows 7 Professional (Full): $299.99
    * Windows 7 Ultimate (Full): $319.99

 

There are additional detail worth a read. From the Windows blog:

Today we have some news to share around Windows 7 including answering what may be some of the “hottest” questions people have as we head toward General Availability (GA) on October 22nd.

I had the opportunity to sit down with Brad Brooks, Corporate VP for Windows Consumer Marketing, to talk about today’s announcements.

 
Announcing the Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program & Windows 7 Pricing
 

As Brad discussed in the video, today we’re announcing details for the Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program, pricing, and a special pre-order offer for select markets.

But first, I want to talk a little bit more about GA and the worldwide availability of Windows 7. We’ve really focused a lot of our efforts on getting the product out to as many people around the world as quickly as possible. OEMs will start shipping PCs with Windows 7 in all language versions beginning on GA, October 22nd.

And for our retail software, we’ve made significant strides in terms of timing. Gone are the days when it could take months for all language versions to be available. In fact – we’ve narrowed the gap to just over ONE week!

On October 22nd, Windows 7 will be available in the following 14 languages: English, Spanish, Japanese, German, French, Italian, Dutch, Russian, Polish, Brazilian Portuguese, Korean, Simplified Chinese, Traditional Chinese and Chinese (Hong Kong).

Then on October 31st, the remaining 21 languages will become available: Turkish, Czech, Portuguese, Hungarian, Swedish, Danish, Norwegian, Finnish, Greek, Ukrainian, Romanian, Arabic, Lithuanian, Bulgarian, Estonian, Slovenian, Hebrew, Thai, Croatian, Serbian Latin, and Latvian.

Windows 7 truly is a global release and I’m excited to be able to tell my international friends that when I say Windows 7 will be available for the holidays – I mean everywhere in the world.

But, you don’t have to wait until GA to get a new Windows PC. In fact, we know many people need that new PC sooner – for back to school specifically. And we have the answer for people who need a new PC now but still want to get Windows 7 and that’s the Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program, which kicks off tomorrow, June 26th! Anyone who buys a PC from a participating OEM or retailer with Windows Vista Home Premium, Business or Ultimate on it will all receive an upgrade to the corresponding version of Windows 7 at little or no cost to customers. The Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program will be available until January 31st, 2010 – and is global! For more information on taking advantage of the Windows 7 Upgrade Option Program, visit www.windows.com/upgradeoffer.

Another one of the most common questions I get is: how much will Windows 7 cost? Well, today we’re sharing these details.

For Windows 7, we are reducing the price on our most popular retail product for customers, the Home Premium Upgrade, by approximately 10% (depending on the market). In the U.S., this means a customer buying Windows 7 Home Premium upgrade will pay only $119.99 instead of the $129.99 being charged today for its predecessor.

Overall, customers will be paying less and getting more with Windows 7. This includes fun new features such as HomeGroup, Device Stage, Aero Shake, Snap, Peek, Jump Lists and our completely redesigned Windows Taskbar (one of my favorite new features in Windows 7 today). These new features make your PC simpler and much easier to use.


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